Video Clips   Home
  
   About This Site

   Video Segments
   Contact Us
   Attachment Package
   Loader Rake
   Long Forks
   Helpful Resources
   Send Feedback


Full text of booklet,
"How To Clear Land"




Let's summarize...

How To Clear Land:  Get a backhoe, get some forks, get a rake, locate a stump dump, clear your land, be careful, take your time, create a beautiful setting... enjoy yourself. Life is good.

 



TOPIC:

VIDEOS:

CONTENT:
Before
Clearing
Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5
Before there was clearing, there was jungle.  Here are several scenes of thickets, brush, hedgerows, and overgrowth that needed to be removed.  Clip 4 and 5 show the research phase where a machete is used to create some sight lines and get to know the land, prior to clearing with heavy equipment.
Battlefront Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5

I call the face of any brush wall I want to clear with as "the battlefront".  I don't attack it along its whole face.  I pick a spot and make an inroad.  To work along the whole battlefront will result in having to repeatedly reposition the machine.  Here are a few scenes of inroads created to break large un-cleared tracts into smaller, more manageable areas.

Toppling Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5
Toppling is Step 1 in clearing land with a backhoe.  First, take into consideration the conditions of the area under attention.  If you can, approach objects you intend to remove from the high side, if the terrain is sloped.  In general, it's easier to pull yourself forward as you make progress if you're tipped with the slope, as opposed to against it.  Here are scenes of a few toppling encounters.
Inroads Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5
In order to make efficient progress, make an inroad from a likely point along my battlefront.  I clear what I can reach from the current machine position, and then move forward.  This first inroad heads straight, or wanders, depending on the mission at hand, or the lay of the land.  Later, other inroads are started from other points.  Inroads begin to intersect and the land becomes steadily more clear than unclear.
Piling Clip 1
Clip 2

Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5
Despite how it may look, it's quite organized. A big part of that organization is dealing with debris as you are creating it. So how the debris is piled is important.  Debris on the ground is as big, or bigger, than when it's standing and you'll quickly get boxed in, or blocked from further progress if you don't handle the debris properly.
Lifting Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5
To summarize lifting: Put a pair of forks on the backhoe's front end loader. Use extra long ones. Get used to them. Take big bites. Learn some good techniques for compacting, handling, and lifting debris.  With loads laid carefully across the six-foot gap between the forks, I was making trip after trip a thousand feet and more to the bone yard without assistance.  And you never get out of the machine.
Moving Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5
The route you take to carry debris off to the bone yard or stump dump may wander, since it needs to be at least as wide as the load that's laid across the front of your backhoe.  As best you can, plan and open up a way back to the bone yard that will accommodate your widest load.  Here are several scenes of showing how's it's done.
Bone Yard Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5
The forks I use are extra long, which allowed me to slide under and lift very large piles of debris.  Then I drive it off, (to get it out the way) to the "bone yard".  The "bone yard" is my nickname for the intermediate holding area where I stored carefully arranged ranks of debris, safely away from the action, until final dumping.
Stump Dump Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5
On my property, not overly far from my clearing project, there's a broad and deep, amphitheatre-shaped depression at least several hundred feet across and fifty feet at its deepest. It's in a thickly wooded area I call, the back land. With an old logging road running along the top, it would makes a great stump dump.
Before Raking Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5
After the major clearing has been accomplished, there's a lot of small debris, surface stones, partially exposed boulders, potholes, tire ruts, and scrubby shoots that remain.  Believe me, it's not the kind of stuff you can mow over, let rot, or rake up by hand.  Here are several scenes showing what it looks like at this point.
Rake Attachments Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4

I designed a loader rake and had it fabricated locally.  I took it back to get beefed-up when I discovered how much force can be generated at the cutting edge of a front end loader and bent some teeth. Since those improvements were made, this rake has been my right hand man for gathering up all the small stuff.  Check it out.
After Raking Clip 1
Clip 2
Clip 3
Clip 4
Clip 5
The rake not only clears the small debris, but with subsequent additional passes, it continues to smooth and level the terrain. This simple little rake has helped eliminate tire ruts, uneven areas, and all sorts of small holes left over from clearing.